The Fox Family - Charles James FOX (Foundling)





Charles James FOX (Foundling)

      Sex: M

Individual Information
          Birth: Abt 1801 - London, England
    Christening: 26 Dec 1804 - Stepney, London, England
          Death: 15 Sep 1871 - Bromley St Mary, London, England
         Burial: 

Events
He worked as a waterman's apprentice on 18 Nov 1819, indentured to Charles Tomlin at Limehouse.
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He worked as a waterman on 4 Jan 1827, when he completed his apprenticeship.
In the 1841 census Charles's age is shown as 35
He appeared in the 1841 census living at 25 Star Street, Shadwell, London, England.
In the 1841 census Charles's status is married
He worked as a Waterman in 1841,.
In the 1851 census Charles's age is shown as 49
He appeared in the 1851 census living at 25 Star Street, Shadwell, London, England.
In the 1851 census Charles's status is married
He worked as a Waterman in 1851,.
In the 1861 census Charles's age is shown as 59
He appeared in the 1861 census living at 25 Star Street, Shadwell, London, England.
In the 1861 census Charles's status is married
He worked as a Waterman in 1861,.
He lived at Stepney Union Workhouse, St Leonard Street, Bromley St Mary, London, England on 30 Apr 1864 (admitted)
.
In the 1871 census Charles's age is shown as 69
He appeared in the 1871 census living at Stepney Union Workhouse, St Leonard Street, Bromley St Mary, London, England.
In the 1871 census Charles's status is widower
He worked as a Waterman in 1871,.
He lived at Stepney Union Workhouse, St Leonard Street, Bromley St Mary, London, England on 26 Aug 1871 (discharged)
.
He lived at Devons Road Sick Asylum, Bromley St Mary, London, England on 27 Aug 1871 (admitted)
.
He lived at Devons Road Sick Asylum, Bromley St Mary, London, England on 15 Sep 1871.


Parents
         Father: Charles FOX (Adoptive Parent) (      -      ) (Relationship: Adopted)
         Mother: [UNKNOWN] (Adoptive Parent) (      -      ) (Relationship: Adopted)
         Father: [UNKNOWN] (      -      ) (Relationship: Biological)
         Mother: [UNKNOWN] (      -      ) (Relationship: Biological)

Spouses and Children
1. *Phoebe Hooper WATERS (14 Jan 1803 - Jul 1866)
       Marriage: 17 Apr 1825 - Stepney, London, England
         Status: 
       Children:
                1. Charles James Francis FOX (Abt 1827-1894)
                2. Phoebe FOX (Abt 1828-      )
                3. Emma FOX (Abt 1830-      )
                4. Ann FOX (Abt 1832-1846)
                5. Amelia FOX (Abt 1834-1849)
                6. Frances (Fanny) FOX (Abt 1836-      )
                7. Sarah FOX (Abt 1839-      )

Notes
Birth Notes:
Lying-in Hospital, City Road
Christening Notes:
St Dunstans
Death Notes:
Devons Road Sick Asylum
General:
Records for The Lying-In Hospital, City Road, are held at the LMA but the admissions registers covering this period were 'sent for salvage' during the Second World War. It looks like the governors' minute books may have survived so there may be something to be gleaned from them next time we visit LMA. Failing that the only information we have comes from the St Dunstan's parish record (qv).

From: The New Sporting Magazine - 2nd August 1831

Shadwell Regatta, August 2nd

Notwithstanding the immense crowd of individuals that assembled this day at Greenwich, the river at Shadwell and its vicinity presented an equally animated and gay appearance on the same afternoon, the shipping and numerous craft being crowded with spectators to witness the match for a new wherry*, given by the inhabitants of St. Paul, Shadwell. The contest was in four heats, by the following men:- Charles Fox, King James Stairs, red; William Fenwick, Shadwell Dock, yellow; James Smith, Shadwell Dock, purple; Magness Smith, Shadwell Dock, pink; William Frogley, Cole Stairs, blue; and Charles Cole, Bell Wharf Stairs, green. The match extended from Bell Wharf to New Crane Dock, three times round in each heat. In the fourth, or grand heat, pink, red and purple contended - they having proved themselves the best men of the first three heats. Pink took the lead, closely followed by red, who succeeded in rounding the boat first. Red then maintained his advantage and won the wherry, pink coming second. The Monarch, built by Mr Lyon of Stangate, was the winning boat.



*
wherries along the tideway in London were water taxis operated by watermen and in Elizabethan times their use was widespread. A wherry could be rowed by two men with long oars or by a single waterman using short oars or 'sculls'. An Act of Parliament in 1555 specified that a wherry should be "22 feet long and 4 wide 'amidships'" and could carry up to five passengers. According to one account concerning Shakespeare's Globe Theatre, "Patrons were transported across the River Thames to Southwark by 'wherry boats'. At one time over two thousand wherries made their way to and from the theatre district. During the eighteenth century rowing competitions for watermen became established on the Thames, and the prize was often a new wherry. The Sporting Magazine describes an event on 6 August 1795 as "the contest for the annual wherry given by the Proprietors of Vauxhall by six pairs of oars in three heats". In 1822 Bell's Life reported on a contest on 30 June between eight watermen belonging to the Temple Stairs for "a prize wherry given by the gentlemen of the Inns of Court" and on 31 July "the anniversary of the Grand Aquatic Regatta of the inhabitants of Queenhithe", when "a handsome Wherry" and other prizes were contended for by "six of the free watermen belonging to those stairs". In 1820 there were still 3,000 wherries plying on the Thames, while in the same year there were only 1,200 hackney coaches. As late as 1829, the usual means of crossing the river from Westminster to Vauxhall was by boat, but the wherryman's trade came to an end when new bridges were built and cheap steamboats were put on the river.

Marriage Notes (Phoebe Hooper Waters)
Spitalfields Christ Church




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Last updated 28 May 2013